2022 sexual harassment training
requirements by state

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More and more state governments are requiring employers to provide sexual harassment training to their employees. The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) receives an average of more than 25,000 workplace harassment complaints per year. These incidents lead to a demoralized workforce, lost productivity, or worse. So even if your state doesn’t require you to offer harassment training, it’s a good practice. And if you’re wondering what your state requires of you, we’ve pulled together this helpful guide.

 

Note that even if your state isn’t updating the laws right now, this could change in the future. Being proactive on this issue is both a best practice and a way to build a strong culture in your workplace. Even if you have a smaller business without an HR department or manager, these training programs are an important part of creating a positive work environment and curbing workplace harassment. We recommend taking steps now to not only be legally compliant and to shield yourself from liability for harassment suits, but to also provide a safe, engaging work experience for your employees.

Alabama

Updated November 22, 2021

 

Training is not required, however employers are encouraged to:

  • Affirmatively raise the subject
  • Express strong disapproval
  • Develop appropriate sanctions
  • Inform employees of their right to raise and how to raise the issue of harassment under Chapter 4112. of the Revised Code
  • Develop methods to sensitize all concerned

 

 

 

For more information

Alaska

Updated November 22, 2021

 

Training is not required, however employers are encouraged to:

  • Affirmatively raise the subject
  • Express strong disapproval
  • Develop appropriate sanctions
  • Inform employees of their right to raise and how to raise the issue of harassment under Chapter 4112. of the Revised Code
  • Develop methods to sensitize all concerned

 

For more information

Arizona

Updated November 22, 2021

 

Training is not required, however employers are encouraged to:

  • Affirmatively raise the subject
  • Express strong disapproval
  • Develop appropriate sanctions
  • Inform employees of their right to raise and how to raise the issue of harassment under Chapter 4112. of the Revised Code
  • Develop methods to sensitize all concerned

 

For more information

Arkansas

Updated November 22, 2021

 

Training is not required, however employers are encouraged to:

  • Affirmatively raise the subject
  • Express strong disapproval
  • Develop appropriate sanctions
  • Inform employees of their right to raise and how to raise the issue of harassment under Chapter 4112. of the Revised Code
  • Develop methods to sensitize all concerned

 

For more information

California

Updated November 22, 2021

 

Harassment training required. Employers with five or more employees must train all employees and supervisors within six months of their start date, and then retrain every two years. An employer who has provided this training and education to an employee is not required to provide refresher training and education again until two years thereafter.

 

What’s required:

  • Supervisory employees must complete at least two hours of classroom or other interactive training and education on sexual harassment prevention. New supervisory employees must be trained within six months of their assumption of a supervisory position.
  • Nonsupervisory employees must complete at least one hour of classroom or interactive training and education. New nonsupervisory employees must be trained within six months of their hire.
  • Temporary and seasonal employees – or any employee hired to work less than 6 months – must also be trained within 30 calendar days after their hire date or within 100 hours worked, whichever comes first.

 

This training must explain:

  • The definition of sexual harassment under the Fair Employment and Housing Act and Title VII of the federal Civil Rights Act of 1964
  • The statutes and case-law principles prohibiting and preventing sexual harassment
  • The types of conduct that can be sexual harassment
  • The remedies available for victims of sexual harassment
  • Strategies to prevent sexual harassment
  • Supervisors’ obligation to report harassment
  • Practical examples of harassment
  • The limited confidentiality of the complaint process
  • Resources for victims of sexual harassment, including to whom they should report it
  • How employers must correct harassing behavior
  • What to do if a supervisor is personally accused of harassment
  • The elements of an effective anti-harassment policy and how to use it
  • The definition of abusive conduct under Government Code section 12950.1, subdivision (g)(2)

Finally, any training must include questions that assess learning, skill-building activities to assess understanding and application of content, and hypothetical scenarios about harassment with discussion questions.

 

For more information

Colorado

Updated November 22, 2021

 

Training not required, however employers are encouraged to:

  • Affirmatively raise the subject
  • Express strong disapproval
  • Develop appropriate sanctions
  • Inform employees of their right to raise and how to raise the issue of harassment under Chapter 4112. of the Revised Code
  • Develop methods to sensitize all concerned

 

For more information

Connecticut

Updated November 22, 2021

Harassment training required. Employers of all sizes must provide at least two hours of sexual harassment training to supervisors. Employers with three or more employees must provide at least two hours of training to all employees within six months of hiring. For more information

District of Columbia

Updated November 22, 2021

 

Training required only if employees are tipped. This training must be developed by the D.C. Office of Human Rights (OHR) or presented by an OHR-certified provider.

  • New tipped employees must receive this training within 90 days of employment unless they have received training within the past 2 years. This training can be in-person or online.
  • Owners, operators, and managers must receive training every 2 years.
    • In-person training is required for all managers.
    • All owners and operators can attend training in-person or online.
  • Employers with tipped employees must also create and distribute a sexual harassment policy and post it in a conspicuous place.

 

For more information

Delaware

Updated November 22, 2021

 

Employers with 50 or more employees must provide interactive training and education on the prevention of sexual harassment. Employers must train new employees within a year of their start date and every two years after that. Exceptions are:

  • Applicants.
  • Independent contractors.
  • Employees employed less than six months continuously.
  • Employees employed by employment agencies (the employment agency is responsible for training their employees).

 

The training must cover:

  • The illegality of sexual harassment
  • Definition of sexual harassment with examples
  • Legal remediation and compliant process
  • Direct employees on how to contact the Delaware Department of Labor
  • The legal prohibition against retaliation

 

Special training for supervisors must include:

  • The specific responsibilities of a supervisor regarding preventing and correcting sexual harassment
  • An explanation that retaliation is unlawful and prohibited. Format The training must be interactive

 

For more information

Florida

Updated November 22, 2021

 

No training is required for private-sector employees, but it is recommended. Training on affirmative action and equal opportunity, including sexual harassment training, is required for all supervisors in Florida government executive branch agencies.

 

For more information

Georgia

Updated November 22, 2021

 

Training is not required, but is recommended.

Employers are encouraged to:

  • Affirmatively raise the subject
  • Express strong disapproval
  • Develop appropriate sanctions
  • Inform employees of their right to raise and how to raise the issue of harassment under Chapter 4112. of the Revised Code
  • Develop methods to sensitize all concerned

 

For more information

Hawaii

Updated November 22, 2021

 

Training not required, but encouraged. The state encourages employers to take any necessary preventative measures against sexual harassment. Employers are encouraged to:

  • Affirmatively raise the subject
  • Express strong disapproval
  • Develop appropriate sanctions
  • Inform employees of their right to raise the issue of sexual harassment
  • Inform employees of how to report sexual harassment
  • Take any other steps necessary to prevent sexual harassment from occurring.

 

For more information

Idaho

Updated November 22, 2021

 

Training is recommended but not required. The Idaho Human Rights Commission states: Effective policies and employee training can go a long way towards discouraging improper conduct before it becomes serious enough to violate the law.

 

For more information

Illinois

Updated November 11, 2020

 

Employers with 15 or more employees must provide this training at least once a year, with recordkeeping. Additional training required for restaurants and bars. The Department of Human Rights will develop and adopt a sexual harassment training program, which all employers will use, unless they establish another that “equals or exceeds the minimum standards provided by the model.”

 

The training must include:

  • The definition of sexual harassment
  • Examples of conduct that constitute unlawful sexual harassment
  • A statement that it is the employer’s responsibility to prevent, investigate, and address sexual harassment
  • A summary of federal and state laws addressing sexual harassment, including available remedies for victims of harassment

 

Additional Requirements for Restaurants and Bars

The law requires all bars and restaurants to provide employees a written sexual harassment policy in English and Spanish within the first calendar week of employment, and supplemental training in English and Spanish.

The policy must include:

  • A prohibition on sexual harassment
  • The definition of sexual harassment
  • Details on how an individual can report an allegation of sexual harassment internally, including options for making a confidential report to a manager, owner, corporate headquarters, human resources department, or other internal reporting mechanism that may be available
  • An explanation of the internal complaint process available to employees
  • How to contact and file a charge with the Illinois Department of Human Rights (IDHR)  and the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
  • A prohibition on retaliation for reporting sexual harassment allegations
  • A requirement that all employees participate in sexual harassment prevention training

 

Recordkeeping

Employers must report to the IDHR the number of adverse judgments or administrative rulings involving sexual harassment and unlawful discrimination on a yearly basis.

 

For more information

Indiana

Updated November 22, 2021

 

Training is not required, but is recommended.

 

Employers are encouraged to:

  • Affirmatively raise the subject
  • Express strong disapproval
  • Develop appropriate sanctions
  • Inform employees of their right to raise and how to raise the issue of harassment under Chapter 4112. of the Revised Code
  • Develop methods to sensitize all concerned

 

For more information

Iowa

Updated November 22, 2021

 

No training is required for private-sector employees. However, the state strongly recommend that all employers train supervisors and employees regarding the employer’s policy, per the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission guidelines.

All state government agency employees must attend affirmative action, cultural diversity, and sexual harassment prevention training.

 

For more information

Kansas

Updated November 22, 2021

 

No training is required for private-sector employees. Employees and interns of executive government agencies must take annual sexual harassment training. The Kansas Human Rights Commission has an online harassment training program on its website.

 

For more information

Kentucky

Updated November 22, 2021

 

No training is required for private-sector employees. State employees receive sexual harassment training once every two years.

 

For more information

Louisiana

Updated November 22, 2021

 

The state requires all state employees to receive 1 hour of harassment training each year, and supervisors must receive additional training. No training is required for private-sector employees.

 

For more information

Maine

Updated November 22, 2021

 

Harassment training required. Employers with 15 or more employees must use a checklist developed by the Maine Department of Labor in developing the sexual harassment training program, with recordkeeping. They must use this checklist to train every employee within one year of his or her start date. They must also offer additional training to managers and supervisors, and post in a prominent and accessible location their sexual harassment policy.

 

Compliance Checklist

The Maine Department of Labor provides a mandatory compliance checklist for employers covering the education and training requirements. Employers must use this checklist to develop a sexual harassment training program and must keep a record of the training, including a record of employees who have received the required training for at least three years. Records must be made available for departmental inspection upon request.

 

The training for all employees must include:

  • The illegality of sexual harassment
  • The definition of sexual harassment under the Maine Human Rights Law and federal law
  • A description of sexual harassment, using examples
  • The internal complaint process available to the employee
  • The legal recourse and complaint process available from the Maine Human Rights Commission
  • Directions on how to contact the commission
  • Information about retaliation protections

 

Additional training for supervisory and managerial employees must include:

  • The specific responsibilities of supervisory and managerial employees
  • Actions that supervisory and managerial employees must take to ensure immediate and appropriate corrective action in addressing sexual harassment complaints

 

Recordkeeping

  • Employers must keep a record of the training, including employees receiving the training.
  • Employers must maintain training records for at least three years.

 

Workplace Posting

An employer is required to post in a poster in a prominent and accessible location in the workplace that includes:

  • The illegality of sexual harassment
  • A description of sexual harassment, with examples
  • The complaint process available through the Maine Human Rights Commission
  • Directions on how to contact the commission

 

Employee Notification

Employers are required to annually provide all employees with individual written notice that includes the following:

  • A statement about the illegality of sexual harassment
  • The definition of sexual harassment under state law
  • A description of sexual harassment, utilizing examples
  • The internal complaint process available to the employee
  • The legal recourse and complaint process available through the Maine Human Rights Commission
  • Directions on how to contact the commission
  • The protection against retaliation
  • The notice must be delivered in a manner that ensures all employees receive notice, without exception

 

For more information

Maryland

Updated November 22, 2021

 

Training is not required. However, the Maryland Commission on Human Relations encourages employers to take steps to prevent sexual harassment.

In deciding the outcome of a sexual harassment case, the agency will favorably consider the preventative steps the employer has taken.

 

To reduce exposure to charges of sexual harassment, employers are encouraged to:

  • Establish and maintain anti-harassment policies
  • Establish a complaint process for employees who believe they have been sexually harassed
  • Make staff aware of policies and the complaint process
  • Notify their workforce about these policies; and
  • Provide training to assist employees and supervisors in recognizing and preventing sexual harassment

 

For more information

Massachusetts

Updated November 22, 2021

 

Training is not required, but it is encouraged. Massachusetts’ Fair Employment Practices Act encourages employers and labor organizations to conduct an education and training program for new employees and members, within one year of commencement of employment or membership.

The law does require a sexual harassment policy to be written out for companies of 6 or more employees. Employers must distribute a written version of their sexual harassment policy annually to all employees and to each new employee at the beginning of employment.

 

For more information

Michigan

Updated November 22, 2021

 

Training is not required. The department of civil rights is required to offer training programs to all employers, labor organizations and employment agencies to assist in understanding requirements. For more information

Minnesota

Updated November 22, 2021

 

Training is not required, but is recommended as a best practice.

 

Employers are encouraged to:

  • Affirmatively raise the subject
  • Express strong disapproval
  • Develop appropriate sanctions
  • Inform employees of their right to raise and how to raise the issue of harassment under Chapter 4112. of the Revised Code
  • Develop methods to sensitize all concerned

 

For more information

Mississippi

Updated November 22, 2021

 

No training is required for private-sector employees. All state employees must take an online sexual harassment training course. For more information

Missouri

Updated November 22, 2021

 

Training is not required, but is recommended as a best practice.

 

Employers are encouraged to:

  • Affirmatively raise the subject
  • Express strong disapproval
  • Develop appropriate sanctions
  • Inform employees of their right to raise and how to raise the issue of harassment under Chapter 4112. of the Revised Code
  • Develop methods to sensitize all concerned

 

For more information

Montana

Updated November 22, 2021

 

Training is not required, but is recommended as a best practice.

Employers are encouraged to:

  • Affirmatively raise the subject
  • Express strong disapproval
  • Develop appropriate sanctions
  • Inform employees of their right to raise and how to raise the issue of harassment under Chapter 4112. of the Revised Code
  • Develop methods to sensitize all concerned

 

For more information

Nebraska

Updated November 22, 2021

 

No training is required. However, according to the Nebraska Equal Opportunity Commission, employers need to have an effective complaint process, provide anti-harassment training to all employees, and take immediate and appropriate action when an individual complains. For more information

Nevada

Updated November 22, 2021

 

No training is required for private-sector employees. State employee training required. For more information

New Hampshire

Updated November 22, 2021

 

Training is not required, but is recommended as a best practice.

Employers are encouraged to:

  • Affirmatively raise the subject
  • Express strong disapproval
  • Develop appropriate sanctions
  • Inform employees of their right to raise and how to raise the issue of harassment under Chapter 4112. of the Revised Code
  • Develop methods to sensitize all concerned

 

For more information

New Jersey

Updated November 22, 2021

 

No training is required for private-sector employees. New Jersey state government employees and supervisors are required to be trained. For more information

New Mexico

Updated November 22, 2021

 

Training is not required, but is recommended as a best practice.

Employers are encouraged to:

  • Affirmatively raise the subject
  • Express strong disapproval
  • Develop appropriate sanctions
  • Inform employees of their right to raise and how to raise the issue of harassment under Chapter 4112. of the Revised Code
  • Develop methods to sensitize all concerned

 

For more information

New York

Updated November 22, 2021

 

Training required. All employers must provide employees with annual, interactive sexual harassment training. You may use the model sexual harassment prevention training program provided by the NYDHR and New York Department or Labor (NYDOL), or establish a program that equals or exceeds those standards. Employers are not required to provide additional training to supervisors or managers.

 

The training must be interactive.

It may be online, or in-person. It may not consist only of watching a training video or reading a document with no feedback mechanism or interaction.

 

The training must include:

  • An explanation of sexual harassment consistent with guidance issued by the NYDOL and the NYDHR
  • Examples of unlawful sexual harassment
  • Information concerning federal and New York statutes on sexual harassment and remedies available to victims of sexual harassment
  • Information concerning employees’ rights and all available forums for adjudicating complaints

 

For more information

 

New York City

 

New York City employers with 15 or more employees — including contractors and interns — must comply with the New York State laws, but there are additional training requirements under the Stop Sexual Harassment in NYC Act. Employers are required to train employees annually and are encouraged to train new employees as soon as possible. This applies to any employees who work more than 80 hours in a calendar year and work for at least 90 days. Employers may provide their own training or use the online training module developed by the NYCCHR and shared on the agency’s website.

 

The training must be interactive, which means participatory teaching that engages the trainee using:

  • Trainer and trainee interaction.
  • The use of audio and visual aids.
  • A computer or online training program.

 

The training must include:

  • A description of sexual harassment, with examples
  • An explanation of sexual harassment as a form of unlawful discrimination under New York City law
  • A statement that sexual harassment is also a form of unlawful discrimination under New York and federal law
  • Any internal complaint process available to employees to address sexual harassment claims
  • The complaint process available from the New York City Commission on Human Rights (NYCCHR), the NYDHR, and the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, including contact information
  • A statement that retaliation is prohibited and examples of retaliation
  • Information regarding bystander intervention, including any   resources explaining how to engage in bystander intervention
  • The specific responsibilities of supervisory and managerial employees in preventing sexual harassment and retaliation and actions that supervisors and managers may take to address sexual harassment complaints appropriately

 

Recordkeeping

Employers must keep a record of all training, including a signed employee acknowledgment (which may be electronic) for at least three years.

 

For more information

North Carolina

Updated November 22, 2021

 

No training is required for private-sector employees but is recommended. All state agencies are required to develop a plan on unlawful workplace harassment that includes training and other methods to educate state employees. For more information

North Dakota

Updated November 22, 2021

 

Training is not required but is recommended.

Employers are encouraged to:

  • Affirmatively raise the subject
  • Express strong disapproval
  • Develop appropriate sanctions
  • Inform employees of their right to raise and how to raise the issue of harassment under Chapter 4112. of the Revised Code
  • Develop methods to sensitize all concerned

 

For more information

Ohio

Updated November 22, 2021

 

Training is not required but state law recommends it. However, according to the Ohio Administrative Code, “Prevention is the best tool for the elimination of sexual harassment.

 

To reduce exposure to charges of sexual harassment, employers are encouraged to:

  • Affirmatively raise the subject
  • Express strong disapproval
  • Develop appropriate sanctions
  • Inform employees of their right to raise and how to raise the issue of harassment under Chapter 4112. of the Revised Code
  • Develop methods to sensitize all concerned

 

For more information

Oklahoma

Updated November 22, 2021

 

Training is not required for private-sector employees, but is recommended. All state personnel who investigate complaints of discrimination are required to be trained in the areas of equal opportunity (including sexual harassment), discrimination and burdens of proof.

 

For more information

Oregon

Updated November 22, 2021

 

Training is recommended but not required. According to the Oregon Government Technical Assistance for Employers, training for staff is essential. “Employers should have departmental or unit meetings to explain policies and grievance procedures, so that all employees understand what is prohibited conduct and how to complain about it.”

 

Employers are encouraged to:

  • Affirmatively raise the subject
  • Express strong disapproval
  • Develop appropriate sanctions
  • Inform employees of their right to raise and how to raise the issue of harassment under Chapter 4112. of the Revised Code
  • Develop methods to sensitize all concerned

 

For more information

Pennsylvania

Updated November 22, 2021

 

No training is required for private-sector employees. All state government agency employees are required to receive sexual harassment prevention training, which may include written materials, educational videos, orientation sessions, workplace discussions, and individual counseling.

 

For more information

Rhode Island

Updated November 22, 2021

 

Training is encouraged for employers with 50 employees or more, but is not required. Employers are also encouraged to conduct an education and training program for new employees. Employers are encouraged to conduct additional training for new supervisory and managerial employees which shall include their specific responsibilities and the methods they should use to address sexual harassment complaints. Employers and appropriate state agencies are encouraged to cooperate in making this training available. Employers should provide copies of their written policies on sexual harassment to all employees upon their request.

 

Employers should adopt a policy against sexual harassment that includes:

  • A statement that sexual harassment in the workplace is unlawful
  • A statement that it is unlawful to retaliate against an employee for filing a complaint of sexual harassment or for cooperating in an investigation of a complaint for sexual harassment
  • A description and examples of sexual harassment
  • A statement of the range of consequences for employees who are found to have committed sexual harassment
  • A description of the process for filing internal complaints about sexual harassment and the work addresses and telephone numbers of the person or persons to whom complaints should be made
  • The identity of the appropriate state and federal employment discrimination enforcement agencies, and directions as to how to contact these agencies
  • Provide to all employees a written copy of the employer’s policy against sexual harassment; provided, that a new employee shall be provided such a copy at the time of his or her employment

 

 

Recordkeeping

Employers shall be required to maintain copies of their written policies on sexual harassment at their business premises, and copies of such policies shall be made available to any state or federal employment discrimination enforcement agency upon request.

 

For more information

South Carolina

Updated November 22, 2021

 

Training is not required but is a recommended best practice.

Employers are encouraged to:

  • Affirmatively raise the subject
  • Express strong disapproval
  • Develop appropriate sanctions
  • Inform employees of their right to raise and how to raise the issue of harassment under Chapter 4112. of the Revised Code
  • Develop methods to sensitize all concerned

 

For more information

South Dakota

Updated November 22, 2021

 

Training is recommended but not required. The South Dakota Division of Human Rights of the Department of Labor and Regulation urges prevention.

 

Employers are encouraged to:

  • Affirmatively raise the subject
  • Express strong disapproval
  • Develop appropriate sanctions
  • Inform employees of their right to raise and how to raise the issue of harassment under Chapter 4112. of the Revised Code
  • Develop methods to sensitize all concerned

 

For more information

Tennessee

Updated November 22, 2021

 

Training is required for state employees, only. There is no training requirement for private-sector employees, however employers are encouraged to:

  • Affirmatively raise the subject
  • Express strong disapproval
  • Develop appropriate sanctions
  • Inform employees of their right to raise and how to raise the issue of harassment under Chapter 4112. of the Revised Code
  • Develop methods to sensitize all concerned

 

For more information

Texas

Updated November 22, 2021

 

Required for state government employees within 30 days of the start of employment, with supplemental training every two years thereafter. No training is required for private-sector employees, however employers are encouraged to:

  • Affirmatively raise the subject
  • Express strong disapproval
  • Develop appropriate sanctions
  • Inform employees of their right to raise and how to raise the issue of harassment under Chapter 4112. of the Revised Code
  • Develop methods to sensitize all concerned

 

For more information

Utah

Updated November 22, 2021

 

Training is required for state employees. No training requirement for private-sector employees, however employers are encouraged to:

  • Affirmatively raise the subject
  • Express strong disapproval
  • Develop appropriate sanctions
  • Inform employees of their right to raise and how to raise the issue of harassment under Chapter 4112. of the Revised Code
  • Develop methods to sensitize all concerned

 

For more information

Vermont

Updated November 22, 2021

 

No training required, however employers are encouraged to:

  • Affirmatively raise the subject
  • Express strong disapproval
  • Develop appropriate sanctions
  • Inform employees of their right to raise and how to raise the issue of harassment under Chapter 4112. of the Revised Code
  • Develop methods to sensitize all concerned

 

Vermont’s Fair Employment Practices Act states:

  1. Employers and labor organizations are encouraged to conduct an education and training program for all new employees and members that includes at a minimum all the information outlined in this section within one year after commencement of employment.
  2. Employers and labor organizations are encouraged to conduct an annual education and training program for all employees and members that includes at a minimum all the information outlined in this section.
  3. Employers are encouraged to conduct additional training for new supervisory and managerial employees and members within one year after commencement of employment or membership, which should include at a minimum the information outlined in this section, the specific responsibilities of supervisory and managerial employees, and the actions that these employees must take to ensure immediate and appropriate corrective action in addressing sexual harassment complaints.
  4. In certain instances, the Vermont Attorney General may require employers to conduct annual sexual harassment training for up to three years.

For more information

Virginia

Updated November 22, 2021

 

No training required for private-sector employees, however employers are encouraged to:

  • Affirmatively raise the subject
  • Express strong disapproval
  • Develop appropriate sanctions
  • Inform employees of their right to raise and how to raise the issue of harassment under Chapter 4112. of the Revised Code
  • Develop methods to sensitize all concerned

 

For more information

 

Legislative Branch employees are required to complete sexual harassment. 

Every legislative branch employee shall once every two calendar years complete a sexual harassment training course provided by the Office of the Clerk of the House of Delegates or the Office of the Clerk of the Senate. Training Requirements.

 

Washington

Updated November 22, 2021

 

All covered employers must provide training to all managers, supervisors, and employee. Covered employers must also provide employees with a list of resources, including contact information for the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the Washington State Human Rights Commission, and local advocacy groups focused on preventing sexual harassment and assault.

 

The training must include content on:

  • Preventing sexual assault and sexual harassment in the workplace
  • Preventing sexual discrimination in the workplace
  • Protections for employees who report violations of a state or federal law, rule, or regulation

 

State government employees are required to complete sexual harassment awareness and prevention training at least every five years. New state government employees must complete the training within the first six months after hire, or earlier if required by the state government employer’s sexual harassment policy.

 

For more information

West Virginia

Updated November 22, 2021

 

The state has a model sexual harassment policy for state agencies that encourages the creation off a harassment policy, and training of employees.

 

For more information

Wisconsin

Updated November 22, 2021

 

Training is not required, but the Department of Workforce Development has a harassment information webpage that encourages employers to:

  • Affirmatively raise the subject
  • Express strong disapproval
  • Develop appropriate sanctions
  • Inform employees of their right to raise and how to raise the issue of harassment under Chapter 4112. of the Revised Code
  • Develop methods to sensitize all concerned

 

For more information

Wyoming

Updated November 22, 2021

 

No training required for private-sector employees, however employers are encouraged to:

  • Affirmatively raise the subject
  • Express strong disapproval
  • Develop appropriate sanctions
  • Inform employees of their right to raise and how to raise the issue of harassment under Chapter 4112. of the Revised Code
  • Develop methods to sensitize all concerned

 

For more information

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